DT Swiss 350 vs Hope Pro 4 Bike Hubs in 2021

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The hub of the bike is one of the most important components. It will help to optimize your performance if you’re a seasoned cyclist while making your journey that much easier as a beginner. Today, we’re doing a DT Swiss 350 vs Hope Pro 4 comparison, which are two of the best bike hubs on the market.

They come highly recommended and you’ll soon find out why.

DT Swiss 350 vs Hope Pro 4 Comparison

Which one do you think is the best? The one that’s made to last from high-quality components, that’s what.

To find out which one meets this criterion, read on for our comprehensive review of these quality bike hubs.

1. DT Swiss 350 Hub

First up, we’re taking a look at the former option, which sports a classic build that’s lightweight and customizable. It’s as durable as you would expect and it follows precise engineering principles.

As we said, this is one lightweight bike hub whose weight comes in at 3.52 ounces. It has dimensions of 5.5 by 5.5 by 1.6 inches. Note that it’s available with different spoke holes ranging from 24 to 28 and 32.

This bike hub also comes with a high carrying capacity. The star ratchet system can handle various engagement points from 18 to 36 and 54. So your options are endless and it all depends on your preferences.

Another notable feature of this bike hub is the 130mm QR axle which you can upgrade to a 135mm QR.

Pros
  • It can be utilized with different drivetrains
  • Comes with different spoke hole options
  • Easy to install – no special tools needed!
  • Constructed from lightweight and durable aluminum material
Cons
  • It’s interesting that the 18-tooth step ratchets that this bike hub comes with only provider 20-degree engagement

2. Hope Pro 4 Front Disc Hub

Next up, we have a Hope Pro 4 hub review for you. This colorful model makes a clicking sound while you’re riding your bike. It’s constructed from lightweight and durable aluminum which is the best material for making this kind of thing.

However, this wouldn’t be a DT Swiss 350 vs Hope Pro comparison if we didn’t point out that the Hope Pro 4 is much heavier. It’s also bigger, with dimensions of 7 x 3 x 3 inches. With that said, 13.4 ounces is still pretty lightweight.

It also comes in different options from the 135mm width to the 142 mm width. Another unique feature of this bike hub is the fact that its spoke holes are countersunk machined in. They’re available in various options including 24, 28, 32, and 36.

This means that it’s compatible with most bike wheels and can be utilized with most types of bikes.

Pros
  • Has a unique clicking sound that sets it apart from other bike hubs on the market
  • Features durable stainless steel cartridge bearings
  • Offers a smooth ride
  • Provides upgradable axle standards
  • It’s easy to service
  • Sports a colorful anodized finish
Cons
  • The clicking sound can be loud for some people

What to Choose Between DT Swiss 350 vs Hope Pro 4?

After taking a look at our DT Swiss 350 vs Hope Pro comparison, it’s safe to say that although there are noticeable differences between these two products, there are also many similarities.

For instance, both bike hubs are constructed from durable aluminum which is a sturdy yet lightweight material. It’s the best material to make bike hubs overall.

You can upgrade either of these bicycle hubs if you like and they’re both customizable without the use of any type of special tool.

However, it’s worth considering the differences between these bike hubs in order to help you make a truly informed decision.

Design

The Hope Pro 4 bike hub comes in a nice anodized orange color that’ll really make you stand out. It’s perfect for anyone that wants a colorful bike and it’ll add a pop of color to your biking aesthetic.

On the other hand, the DT Swiss 350 comes in a low-key black and white color combo that’s simple and understated.

The Hope Pro 4 is much larger than the DT Swiss 350 because it weighs 13. 4 ounces and has dimensions of 7 by 3 by 3 inches.

On the other hand, the Swiss 350 is super lightweight at 3.52 ounces and comes with dimensions of 5.5 by 5.5 by 1.6 inches.

Spokes

There are more spokes on the Hope Pro 4 compared to its competitor. In fact, its spoke options include 24, 28, 32, and 36. On the other hand, the DT Swiss 350 only comes with 24, 28, and 32 holes respectively.

Again, the Hope Pro 4 only comes with a 44-tooth engagement while the DT Swiss 350 offers you an18 tooth engagement. You can only upgrade that to a 36 or 54 option.

It’s worth noting that the 350 is known for working smoothly and effortlessly. While the Hope Pro 4 has a unique clicking sound that’s not well-liked by most people.

Conclusion

So, comparing the DT Swiss 350 vs Hope Pro 4, which is the best option? While we cannot tell you that this will absolutely work for everyone, the DT Swiss 350 is the most popular of these two options.

It offers more tooth engagement options, it works smoothly without producing any loud clicking sounds, and it’s lighter than the Hope Pro 4 as well.

Most importantly, there’s a customizable QR axle that measures 130mm which you can upgrade to 135mm QR. You can use this bike hub with many different types of drive trains which is great.

We also love the fact that it’s easy to install because it comes with a press-fit assembly design and there are no special tools required to put it together.

James Mattis

James is a passionate bicyclist who has done about every kind of biking there is. He loves the wind in his hair, the sun over his shoulder and maybe even the bugs in his teeth. No, just kidding about that last item. He isn’t crazy about road burns, either, but acknowledges that to have the good there is the occasional tumble. James feels that his bike is the place where he can unwind, leave troubles alongside the road, meet new people, go new places, and live the life of adventure that he loves. He is ready to share the ride with you.

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