How to Change Bike Seat in 5 Steps

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Want to find out how to change a bike seat? Then you must be having issues with your current bike saddle. Issues typically arise due to an ill-fitting saddle that’s hard on the tush, especially on long-distance rides.

Or your bike seat is just old and has taken so much abuse over the years that it has sustained a fair amount of damage.

This means you’re going to have to replace the bike seat and learn how to change the bike seat in order to fit the new one in.

If you’re still in the process of finding your new bike seat, then you’ll want to keep certain factors in mind. This includes the type of bike that you currently have, your tastes, and your preferred style.

Here are some useful tips on how to change bike seat from start to finish!

How to Replace Bicycle Seat

The process of how to replace a bike seat typically follows some variation of this sequence:

1. Buy a New Bicycle Saddle

Before you learn how to change a bike seat physically, you should start by finding a bike seat that fits your body perfectly.

This means that you should be able to attach it to the two rear bones. Ideally, you want a bike saddle that has a seat that’s not too wide.

That way, your legs won’t be bumping up against it as you paddle, and the saddle should obviously be durable and strong enough to handle your weight.

2. Get Rid of the Old Seat 

Of course, the key to replacing the bicycle seat is to remove the old one first. Otherwise, where are you going to install your new shiny bike saddle?

First things first, look for the bolts that are responsible for keeping the bike seat in its place. The average bike seat typically comes with nuts that measure 4 or 5mm.

Once you’ve determined what size nuts you’re dealing with, you can then figure out what type of wrench you need to use.

Here’s a pro tip for you; have a small empty tin that you can use to put the smaller parts in as you dismantle the bike seat so that you don’t lose them.

3. Install the New Seat 

The next thing you’ll want to do when changing a bicycle seat is to put the new seat in its place on the bike.

All you have to do here is to align the seat rails to the bike frame, and then put the bolt in the corresponding holes.

Fasten the nut with your hand in order to adjust it properly. You want to make sure that the seat is comfortable after installing it by adjusting its position and angle until you’re sure that it’s to your liking.

4. Tighten It 

As you change the bicycle seat, you’re going to want to tighten the bolts after you’ve adjusted the seat.

In order to fully secure the seat, it’s also important to torque the bolts to make sure that the seat can comfortably handle the full weight of your body.

5. Do a Test 

Now that you know how to change a bike seat and have gone through the whole process from start to finish, it’s time to do the best part, which is to test it!

Simply take your bike for a short ride and see if it’s comfortable and stable.

If it needs any adjustments, you should make them now and test it again until you’re satisfied with its performance.

Conclusion

As you can see, learning how to replace a bicycle seat doesn’t have to be rocket science.

All you need are a few simple tools which you probably already have in your garage or shed, and some spare time over the weekend.

Once you know how to change a bike saddle and have done it once, you can do it many times after that and even teach it to someone else!

You’ll be so happy that you learned this skill as it will come in handy at multiple points in your cycling journey.

James is a passionate bicyclist who has done about every kind of biking there is. He loves the wind in his hair, the sun over his shoulder and maybe even the bugs in his teeth. No, just kidding about that last item. He isn’t crazy about road burns, either, but acknowledges that to have the good there is the occasional tumble. James feels that his bike is the place where he can unwind, leave troubles alongside the road, meet new people, go new places, and live the life of adventure that he loves. He is ready to share the ride with you.

1 Comment
  1. Great article and very informative. Thank you.
    A few comments:
    1. Consistent use of units. While chains do use “american” unit widths you interchange metric width values in the article. Be consistent. If referencing a width include the metric value in parenthesis.
    2. You tout mushroomed rivets in your selection of “best” chains but then go on to say lengthening chain is as easy as shortening.
    I think forcing a mushroomed rivet through a link changes the dimensions of the rivet and hole weakening it.

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